We focus on the problem of detecting anomalous run-time behavior of distributed applications from their execution logs. Specifically we mine templates and template sequences from logs to form a control flow graph (cfg) spanning distributed components. This cfg represents the baseline healthy system state and is used to flag deviations from the expected behavior of runtime logs. The novelty in our work stems from the new techniques employed to: (1) overcome the instrumentation requirements or application specific assumptions made in prior log mining approaches, (2) improve the accuracy of mined templates and the cfg in the presence of long parameters and high amount of interleaving respectively, and (3) improve by orders of magnitude the scalability of the cfg mining process in terms of volume of log data that can be processed per day.

We evaluate our template and cfg mining approaches using (a) synthetic log traces and (b) multiple real-world log datasets collected at different layers of application stack. Results demonstrate that the template mining, cfg mining, and our anomaly detection algorithms have high accuracy. The distributed implementation of our pipeline is highly scalable and has more than 500 GB/day of log data processing capability even on a 10 low-end VM based (Spark + Hadoop) cluster.

Filed under: Time Series and Stream Mining